November 26, 2013

Annals of Cycling – 119: Street sweeping … Illegal biking … Bike bullies

An occasional update on items from the Velo-city.

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A CLEAN SWEEP

From bikeportland:

Ever since Portland built its first protected bikeway on SW Broadway over four years ago, the question of how to keep them clean has gone unanswered.  …

That is, until now.

We’re happy to report that PBOT has taken delivery of a new sweeper that is specifically designed to fit inside narrow bike paths. Their new RAVO 5-Seriessweeper has only been in service since last month, but it’s already gotten a lot of action.

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PBOT

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UPDATE: In Vancouver, the active transportation team does have two sweepers that they use to clean bike routes. The Green Machine is a sidewalk type sweeper and the other is a mid-size sweeper:

green machine

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THE ILLEGAL WORLD OF CHILDHOOD

More and more of these stories popping up.  This is from The Tennessean:

Victoria Mathis of Charlotte is in violation of a city code for which she has 30 days to comply before the city of Charlotte will be forced to take legal action.

Mathis was cited by the city for letting her four grandchildren ride their bikes on city streets, and in Charlotte, that’s illegal. …

Charlotte Mayor Bill Davis said it was “absolutely” true that in Charlotte kids can’t ride their bike on roads owned by the town; a resolution passed by the town in 2003 states that no one can “ride an all terrain vehicle, skateboard, roller blades, and roller skates or conduct similar activities on the city streets, in the city park or on the Court Square of Charlotte.”

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BIKE BULLIES

From Crosscut:

bIKE LIGHTThe scariest thing about biking at night in Seattle isn’t the cellphone-jabbering SUV drivers or the bone-crunching potholes. It isn’t the slick mats of rain-sodden leaves waiting to turn unwary riders into convalescing ex-riders. … It’s other cyclists — specifically, their high-powered, strobing and flashing headlights, shine straight into the eyes of motorists and other cyclists, transfixing them with disco-ball distraction. …

What makes bikers light up? “A lot of people act on emotions rather than facts,” suggests Phillips. “They install more lights because they think they’re safer, whatever the facts are.”

The same impulse leads motorists to buy outsized, top-heavy SUVs which are twice as likely as ordinary cars to flip over, and even more likely to plow right over those ordinary cars in a collision. It’s a sociopathic sense of personal security and a belief that safety is a zero-sum game that can only be won at the expense of someone else’s.

More here.

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Comments

  1. Charlotte Mayor Bill Davis said it was “absolutely” true that in Charlotte kids can’t ride their bike on roads owned by the town; a resolution passed by the town in 2003 states that no one can “ride an all terrain vehicle, skateboard, roller blades, and roller skates or conduct similar activities on the city streets, in the city park or on the Court Square of Charlotte.”

    It seems it’s not only Rob Ford that is on crack

  2. Generally supportive of bike lanes, biking, etc., but I HATE HATE HATE the strobing headlights. Live off the 7th Ave bikeway, and when driving at night those headlights are nearly blinding. Not a safety enhancement.